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Intercambio #12: WORKING CONDITIONS AND TEACHERS´ HEALTH

Year 9, No. 12, August 2018

In this issue of Intercambio, we show that in spite of different social backgrounds of our students and living standards in the communities where we work, some things are pervasive. Governments impose policies that generate heavy workloads, longer work days and an excess of administrative tasks on teachers without consulting with them nor their representative organizations. The first article in this issue, by Gary Fenn, presents the findings of research carried out among 7,800 professors from the Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation (OSSTF). The results, which helped spark a dialogue with the Ontario government, were astounding: 1) most teachers considered that the curricular and pedagogical changes implemented were of little use and offered scarce resources; 2) 92% of the teachers did unpaid voluntary and extracurricular work; and 3) the increase in workload has increased levels of stress and sickness among teachers. The research pointed to the fact that almost all teachers felt stressed by work because of students ́ demands, the use of technology and the increase in initiatives from the Ministry of Education. In the second essay, Anne Hales reveals the shocking results of research carried out in 2016 among members of the British Columbia Teachers Federation (BCTF), also in Canada: 65% of the teachers reported high levels of stress, and 68% felt emotionally drained during most of the working day. They agreed that working conditions are inadequate and services insufficient, wreaking havoc on their mental health and making them wish they could abandon the teaching profession. They also explained that when help is requested, they face vast obstacles, which in turn triggers a vicious cycle of stress, anxiety and depression. It is worth mentioning that the teachers believed their union adequately supports and respects them. But the largest source of stress comes from cuts and public education policies which restrict funding and do not appropriately address the needs of students and teachers.

 

PRESENTATION

Stressed Out – Increasing Pressures on Education Workers to do More. Gary Fenn

2 CRITICAL CONDITIONS: Safeguarding Teachers’ Mental Health and Wellbeing. Anne Hales

3 Health and Illness in Teaching Work. Deolidia Martínez

4 TENSIONS INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM: Overworked, Sick and Stressed-out Teachers. Rosana Palacios, Elba Morales, Guillermo Estrella

5 WORK AND HEALTH CONDITIONS, A Pending matter in the Defense of the Rights of Mexican Teachers. Sara Unda Rojas

6 NEOLIBERALISM, PRECARIZATION OF TEACHING WORK AND EDUCATION REFORM IN MÉXICO. Juan Fernando Álvarez GaytánYear 9, No. 12, august 2018

7 THE IMPACT OF NEOLIBERAL POLICIES ON THE HEALTH OF TEACHERS. Gladys Pajuelo Oncoy

8 PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN BRAZILIAN EDUCATION: RESPONDING TO THE PRIVATIZATION OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. CNTE BRAZIL

9 CHALLENGES FOR THE CONTINENTAL STUDENT MOVEMENT. Rodolfo Bautista

Ful PDF: Year 9, No. 12, august 2018

Permanent link to this article: http://idea-network.ca/news/workingconditions